Who Put You in Charge?

With all the discussion happening regarding Universities and Colleges [mis]handlings of on-campus rape cases, many people have never stopped to consider an important question.

Why is that their responsibility?  Why isn’t it taken to the police?

It’s a fair concern.  After all, rape and sexual assault are serious charges.  This article by Politico details not only why, but how it came to be that campus assaults became handled this way.  It’s an incredibly informative piece.

Abstinent Opinions

referenced from usnews.com

referenced from usnews.com

In yet more drama in the college sexual assault front, Donald Eastman III, president of Eckerd College released a statement advising students on how to not get raped.  Needless to say, it was unhelpful, especially because it didn’t address the rapists…

Lucky for us (and their entire school), the student newspaper was having none of his bigoted statement.  They issued an incredible respond, which you can read for yourself here.  Part of this changing means the students getting involved.

And believe me, they are.

Assault Expansion

In New Jersey, a new bill has been introduced that would expand the legal meaning of sexual assault.  Essentially, it criminalizes consensual sex after the fact, if misrepresentation or lies were utilized in acquiring said sex.  Now, I can definitely see where this bill came from, as there are plenty of cases where people have used incredibly unsavory tactics to acquire sex, but I don’t know that it is ready to be passed.  To me, at its current state, it appears that just about any coercion could be criminalized.  If a guy tells you that he knows a celebrity, and you sleep with him, is that a crime?  Or are you just being gullible.  Or is it both?  Is it illegal if you admit that you were lying after the act?  It’s an interested concept, and I can see where a need for something like this would occur.  I’m curious to see if it gets edited and resubmitted or is voted down and simply falls apart.  It could be difficult to prove/charge someone with either way.

Genderless Ideas

I meant to post this on Transgender Day of Remembrance, but missed by one day.  In all fairness, my Thursday was absolutely insane.  I’m making up for it by posting an extra-long blog for y’all today!

Transgender rights has been something that has weighed heavily on my mind lately.  I’m not sure why exactly, but every situation where a trans person would be uncomfortable seems to trigger me.  I think that with all of the developments being made in the arena of gay marriage and gay rights I feel like the basic, simple, everyday rights of transgender people are being forgotten (or at least overshadowed).

So I decided to take a basic internet survey (via posting in several completely non-related groups), regarding transgender bathroom assignment.  To me, this seems relatively straightforward, so I wanted to see how many people agree.  I was also hoping to prompt some interesting conversations for people who haven’t spent any time researching or considering transgender rights.  The survey was fairly simple.  You were asked three questions regarding what bathroom transgender people should use (each question identified a different age group), and you were given three options for answers.  There was then a space for people to express why they had chosen what they had chosen, but this wasn’t required.  I feel that I got responses from people on just about every part of the spectrum, opinion-wise.

The first question was “Do you believe that transgender elementary students should be able to use the bathroom they are most comfortable with?”  They were given the options of “Yes; they should use the bathroom that matches their gender,” “No; they should use the restroom that matches their biological sex,” or “They should use a single-stall separate restroom.”  Out of 65 responses, 38 chose “yes,” 20 chose “no,” and 7 chose “single-stall.”

The second question was “Do you believe that transgender high school students should be able to use the bathroom they are most comfortable with?”  They were given the same answer options as question one.  I decided to choose two different school settings because of the controversy surrounding younger transgender people transitioning while in school.  I was also interested in the younger vs older comparison because of the arguments surrounding the possibility of sexual assault, if restrooms are used by transgender students.  Again, out of 65 responses, 42 chose “yes,” 11 chose “no,” and 12 chose “single-stall.”

The third question was “Do you believe transgender people should be able to use the public bathroom they are most comfortable with?”  They were given the same “yes” and “no” options, but the third option was phrased slightly differently for clarity’s sake.  The third option said “They should use single-stall alternate (family) restrooms.”  I knew that there would be a significant amount of adults taking the survey, and considered them more likely to approach the student questions from a mindset of protecting younger people.  I inserted this questions to attempt to force them to investigate their own personal feelings regarding both being in a restroom with a trans person, and forcing someone their own age to use a restroom they may be uncomfortable with.  I had hoped they would put themselves in the trans person’s shoes when asked from this perspective.  Out of the same 65 people, 46 said “yes,” 8 said “no,” and 11 said “single-stall.”

I was a bit shocked that the statistics didn’t significantly change between questions.  Most people picked all of one answer (i.e. 3 yes or 3 no).  There were only a few people who selected different options for different scenarios.  It seemed that people either decidedly were uncomfortable with people using bathrooms based on gender, or they simply weren’t.  The open responses brought all types of responses; the open-minded, the angry, the explicit, the indifferent, and the generally unrelated.  The prompt simply read “Why or why not?”  Responses ranged from “Biological sex is their true gender regardless of what gender they believe themselves.” to “Because that is their gender even if they weren’t born that way.”  There was on response that used the prompt as an opportunity to criticize America’s handling of restrooms in general, saying

“I personally see no problem with both genders, and sex, sharing the same bathrooms. I think that in America going to the bathroom is over sexualized, where people are appalled at the idea of men and women sharing. The main argument I’ve heard against it is that men will attack women in the bathroom, however, if something like that were to happen I think that would have much more to do with the amount of violence in that area. If someone is twisted enough to attack someone in a bathroom then they’re going to do it regardless of if they’re “allowed” to be in that particular stall or not. A bathroom is a bathroom, we all have to use it, so what’s the big deal with keeping everything separated?”

There were slightly humorous takes on the situation, such as “Because everyone has a right to pee in peace.” and there were also very serious observations, such as “they’re just trying to apply to our socially ascribed rules as fits them.”  There was even a response that simply listed “tough questions” at the end of the survey.

Out of everything contained in this, the thing that shocked me the most were people who seemed to believe that the single-stall bathrooms were a way to make everyone comfortable.  I purposefully placed that answer to see if people genuinely believed that this was a fair solution for all involved, and it seems that many do.  The people who chose the single-stall answers left comments like “It doesn’t bother anyone if they use a family bathroom, and it’s probably less awkward for them, not getting stares and what not.”  They argued that “It’s disrespectful to others that aren’t comfortable with the transgender population.”  They even left responses as blatant as “Because I can’t pee if a person with a penis is in the stall next to me.” I’m not kidding.  I was shocked.  I can’t imagine being told, my whole life, that I can’t use the same restrooms as almost everyone else around me.  Wouldn’t that feel, to you, like you were shouting to the whole world “HEY, LOOK AT ME.  I’M TRANSGENDER.” every time you walked into the single-stall handicapped/family restroom?  There are so many transgender people who go to great lengths to conceal the fact that they are transgender that we don’t even have any accurate statistics on how many people transgender people there are.  Asking them to identify themselves in public by using a specifically dictated bathroom is inhumane.  It’s embarrassing.  It’s hard for me to believe that people think that it’s fair in any respect.

There were two remarks that expressed concern for the safety of the transgender person themselves, saying “I don’t think our society is ready to responsibly and humanely integrate transgender students/adult in a public restroom setting.” I think that this is a valid concern, especially right now.  As this survey clearly indicates, there are a lot of people who are still incredibly uncomfortable with even the idea of a transgender person, forget an actual human being.  That being said, there are many hard-fought wars over basic human rights that have happened within even the past 100 years.  Most of them have resulted in some bloodshed.  I know plenty of transgender people who are willing to fight, and fight hard, for rights as basic as using a public restroom.  There are plenty of LGBTQ people and LGBTQ Allies that will join in that fight (and already have) and shed blood right alongside them.

I don’t think that this survey itself will change the world.  I don’t even know how many people will make it to the end of this post.  What I do know, is that this has opened my eyes to the discrimination coming from all around me, to people who have done nothing to deserve it.  I hope that I’m not the only one it impacts, but if I am?  I’ve certainly taken on a new respect for what’s happening around me.  And with that, I’ve taken on a new fight.

Read All About it!

by Randy Glasbergen

by Randy Glasbergen

I’ve talked about this a lot.  Now, we have a professional article from a legitimate source talking about the handling of sexual assault and rape in universities and colleges.  Honestly it just needs to be talked about in general.  This is serious, this is way more common than it should be, and it’s not slowing down.  Educate yourself, and force the schools to as well.

Personhood Punted

Referenced from the Milwaukee Journal

Referenced from the Milwaukee Journal

Now that the election is [mostly] over, here’s an update on the amendment I previously covered in “Incongruous Terminology” from North Dakota: it failed.  It failed by a lot.  That doesn’t mean that anti-abortion measures and restrictions are done and over with though.  In Tennessee an amendment of similar importance was passed.  It’s a measure that has been long in the making, having originally been introduced more than 10 years ago.  It, just like Colorado and North Dakota, seems to use relatively bland language to avoid offending either side of the pro-life, pro-choice debate.  To me, it looks to use vague-ness and confusion to its benefit, attracting voters much like the other two amendments aimed to.  Tennessee already offers many restrictions on abortion and abortion rights.  This will simply make it easier to enact more of those.  The reason this becomes an issue that involves more people than just those who live in Tennessee is that Tennessee is surrounded by states with heavy restrictions on abortions.  In places like Texas, Missouri, and Mississippi, it’s almost impossible to find anywhere that can still offer abortions.  The ridiculous restrictions being put on these places in an effort to close them has worked.  So many women in these states have relied on neighboring states like Tennessee to keep their abortion clinics open.  I don’t think I need to say that without these regulated, clean, responsible clinics, dangerous alternatives begin popping up.  An underground medical clinic is not the place to get an abortion.  When you hear about all the dangers of abortion: this is where they come from.  They come from places that aren’t government approve.  They show up when government-approved clinics can’t exist anymore.  That is why, regardless of your beliefs regarding abortion, you should carefully rethink your opinions regarding restrictions on abortions.

Blink-Timing

Step right up, ladies and gentlemen, and view one of the most beautiful/horrible examples of on-campus sexual assault awareness.  I’ve said time and time again that universities and colleges need to do more to prevent and respond to sexual assault within their community of students.  This school NAILED IT.  By nailed it, I mean they did one of those things where the point of the nail goes in and then you hammer it sideways accidentally and it bends and you can’t fix it so you just pound it in so far that you can’t see it anymore.